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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
To start with, I've found the clutch adjustment in the manual and followed those instructions with no luck. Then I found someone on this forum recommend following those same steps but have the wheeler in 1st gear. That seemed to help for a day, but the next time I got on it it was right back to having trouble shifting, and attempts to adjust it again proved futile. When I had it shifting properly, I was able to adjust the idle down lower as well. My theory here is that the clutch was not completely disengaging, so the engine had to work harder to stay running, which meant the rpms had to stay up and kept the clutch further engaged. I got this machine cheap as a non runner. A new spark plug and petcock, some carb work and an oil change and it now runs, but it has always been hard to shift except when riding. At idle, or even with the engine off, I often have to rock it forward and back to get the clutch to let loose so I can shift. When riding, however, it seems to shift just fine as long as I get the rpms up a little.

If you've been into the transmissions, and/or clutches and can share some knowledge you've gained I'd appreciate it. The directions I've found for adjusting the clutch just tell me what screws to move, but I have no idea what those are actually doing, so I don't know if there is something I can do different/better. Maybe if you can help me understand exactly what these adjustment screws are doing I can make the necessary adjustments. One of my biggest questions is: why do I loosen the lock nut on the left screw, and tighten it after moving the right screw, but nothing mentions moving the left screw?

Thanks in advance


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Your clutch adjustment is a bit different then say on the 250 Quadrunners and 300 King Quads, where there’s only a single screw/locknut. The two screws is kinda baffling. Maybe someone else with more knowledge of the LT-F500F will chime in and offer up some help. Basically adjusting the clutch is done if you find the clutch is slipping when powering through certain gears, etc. I believe adjusting the clutch won’t help if your experiencing difficulties with hard shifting. But not entirely certain. Do you know what the previous owner used in terms of oil..?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Your clutch adjustment is a bit different then say on the 250 Quadrunners and 300 King Quads, where there’s only a single screw/locknut. The two screws is kinda baffling. Maybe someone else with more knowledge of the LT-F500F will chime in and offer up some help. Basically adjusting the clutch is done if you find the clutch is slipping when powering through certain gears, etc. I believe adjusting the clutch won’t help if your experiencing difficulties with hard shifting. But not entirely certain. Do you know what the previous owner used in terms of oil..?
Unfortunately, I don't have any info about it's life before I got it. I bought it with another parts wheeler from a guy who bought them at an estate sale. I had a similar thought that oil might cause some of the problems, and was thinking I ought to change the oil again. Even though I've only got 15-20 hours on this oil change, I'm wondering if the new oil I put in may have run through and loosened up some gunk from however long it sat before I got it running again. Any particular oil you're partial to, or that you think might make a difference? The manual says to use 10W-40 or higher, and according to the chart in the manual I can run on up to 20W-50 in the temperature ranges I've got here. I don't know enough about different viscosities of oil to know if one might help my issue better than the other.
 

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10w40 is perfectly fine. Reason I was asking is some people think any 10w40 motor oil will work in their motorcycles/atvs when in fact that isn’t so. They think oil is oil, well no. Car oils contain friction modifiers and are formulated with the aim of reducing friction between moving parts in order to provide good fuel economy and efficiency. Also, these oils contain detergent additives, whose ash content is relatively high. If used in motorcycle engines, these could result in the formation of deposits on the piston crowns as well as the valve train. Because detergents are the main cause of pressure build up, this will cause perforation and burning on the components.

Motorcycles oils on the other hand use the same oil for both the engine and the gearbox. They are therefore uniquely formulated to offer protection for engine components and the gears. Compared to car engines, a motorcycle engine oil requires balanced friction characteristics as it needs to lubricate the wet clutch, which in turn transfers engine power to the drivetrain. If the friction level is too low, the clutch will not be able to engage and will cause slippage.

So what does this all mean. Motorcycle oils are formulated to handle the transmission, more specifically, the wet clutches found in most bikes. The oil needs to be slippery enough to protect the engine, but not too slippery. This means that they strike a good balance between clutch performance, engine, and transmission protection. This is something that is not considered in the manufacturing of car oils.
 
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My Kawasaki Bayou 300 and my Suzuki Vinson 500 both had 2 bolt clutch adjustment. I am not sure why there are 2 bolts and they are kind of a pain to adjust. My Bayou needed adjusted a lot more often than my Suzuki does. I think one adjuster takes a majority of the adjustment up. And the second one fine tunes it a bit more but i could be wrong. Last time i adjusted my Vinson it was a bit of a pain and i had to do it 3 times before it felt right.

My clutch has never felt too tight in either bike though so i think you have other problems. When the clutch needs adjusted they feel too loose and slip, maybe you should pull the engine cover off and inspect the clutch or any other damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My Kawasaki Bayou 300 and my Suzuki Vinson 500 both had 2 bolt clutch adjustment. I am not sure why there are 2 bolts and they are kind of a pain to adjust. My Bayou needed adjusted a lot more often than my Suzuki does. I think one adjuster takes a majority of the adjustment up. And the second one fine tunes it a bit more but i could be wrong. Last time i adjusted my Vinson it was a bit of a pain and i had to do it 3 times before it felt right.

My clutch has never felt too tight in either bike though so i think you have other problems. When the clutch needs adjusted they feel too loose and slip, maybe you should pull the engine cover off and inspect the clutch or any other damage.
Pulling the cover and looking it over is on the list of things I know may be necessary, but I don't want to do it. I certainly can, I'm just hoping there is a simple adjustment that can be done with the two screws. Did you ever have to adjust the second screw? None of the adjustment instructions I've seen mention anything other than loosening the second nut, and tightening it after moving the other screw.
 

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Pulling the cover and looking it over is on the list of things I know may be necessary, but I don't want to do it. I certainly can, I'm just hoping there is a simple adjustment that can be done with the two screws. Did you ever have to adjust the second screw? None of the adjustment instructions I've seen mention anything other than loosening the second nut, and tightening it after moving the other screw.

I always adjust the second screw because that's what the manual says to do.
 

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On Honda 3 wheelers, the auto clutch adjustment screw is done by feel. Adjust the screw 1/8 turn from max counter clockwise, then feel the shifter. It should have a normal play in it. If it doesn't than turn the screw slightly until the shifter feels normal.
 

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To start with, I've found the clutch adjustment in the manual and followed those instructions with no luck. Then I found someone on this forum recommend following those same steps but have the wheeler in 1st gear. That seemed to help for a day, but the next time I got on it it was right back to having trouble shifting, and attempts to adjust it again proved futile. When I had it shifting properly, I was able to adjust the idle down lower as well. My theory here is that the clutch was not completely disengaging, so the engine had to work harder to stay running, which meant the rpms had to stay up and kept the clutch further engaged. I got this machine cheap as a non runner. A new spark plug and petcock, some carb work and an oil change and it now runs, but it has always been hard to shift except when riding. At idle, or even with the engine off, I often have to rock it forward and back to get the clutch to let loose so I can shift. When riding, however, it seems to shift just fine as long as I get the rpms up a little.

If you've been into the transmissions, and/or clutches and can share some knowledge you've gained I'd appreciate it. The directions I've found for adjusting the clutch just tell me what screws to move, but I have no idea what those are actually doing, so I don't know if there is something I can do different/better. Maybe if you can help me understand exactly what these adjustment screws are doing I can make the necessary adjustments. One of my biggest questions is: why do I loosen the lock nut on the left screw, and tighten it after moving the right screw, but nothing mentions moving the left screw?

Thanks in advance


View attachment 21475
To start with, I've found the clutch adjustment in the manual and followed those instructions with no luck. Then I found someone on this forum recommend following those same steps but have the wheeler in 1st gear. That seemed to help for a day, but the next time I got on it it was right back to having trouble shifting, and attempts to adjust it again proved futile. When I had it shifting properly, I was able to adjust the idle down lower as well. My theory here is that the clutch was not completely disengaging, so the engine had to work harder to stay running, which meant the rpms had to stay up and kept the clutch further engaged. I got this machine cheap as a non runner. A new spark plug and petcock, some carb work and an oil change and it now runs, but it has always been hard to shift except when riding. At idle, or even with the engine off, I often have to rock it forward and back to get the clutch to let loose so I can shift. When riding, however, it seems to shift just fine as long as I get the rpms up a little.

If you've been into the transmissions, and/or clutches and can share some knowledge you've gained I'd appreciate it. The directions I've found for adjusting the clutch just tell me what screws to move, but I have no idea what those are actually doing, so I don't know if there is something I can do different/better. Maybe if you can help me understand exactly what these adjustment screws are doing I can make the necessary adjustments. One of my biggest questions is: why do I loosen the lock nut on the left screw, and tighten it after moving the right screw, but nothing mentions moving the left screw?

Thanks in advance


View attachment 21475
with a wet clutch system If a bike has been sitting, especially with old oil, all the adjusting in the world will not help if the plates are stuck together. This is not uncommon on wet clutches. The best to do is to disassemble the clutch and scotch bright all the drive plates and just install new friction plates. However you can try this. Hook to a tree or other immoveable object Put the bike in a higher gear and you want to kind of ride the clutch. The heat may loosen the plates and the force may help break them loose. This works on motorcycles that have sticky clutches from sitting over winter except I've put the front tire against a wall or such. If it was mine I'd just replace the clutch with aftermarket and be done with it. ALSO do not use "car" oil. Automotive oil has additive that do not get along with wet clutches.
 
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