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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2013 king quad 400. Sitting on flst ground, no leak, slight incline it leaks. Leaks just enough to smell it and maybe overnight it will wet the skidplate and maybe tablespoon on the ground. I can see a wet spot but can't catch it leaking. Its a crappy phone pic if you can make it out. Tire Automotive tire Tread Wheel Motor vehicle
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Hood
Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire Hood
 

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Your 400 fuel injected..?
 

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I believe that year and model is fuel injected.
You and I were thinking the same thing. Too easy a fix, lol.
Had a feeling it probably was. I seem to have a easy time diagnosing a carbureted atv engines the fuel injected ones. Though that’s mainly because that’s where most of my knowledge comes from, lol.
 

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Had a feeling it probably was. I seem to have a easy time diagnosing a carbureted atv engines the fuel injected ones. Though that’s mainly because that’s where most of my knowledge comes from, lol.
Go with what you know is what I always say.

I would much rather work on carbureted vehicles. However, you can’t beat FI for ease of operation , choke-less starts, altitude , barometric pressure, temperature and fuel curve compensation….
 

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Go with what you know is what I always say.

I would much rather work on carbureted vehicles. However, you can’t beat FI for ease of operation , choke-less starts, altitude , barometric pressure, temperature and fuel curve compensation….
You are definitely right there John. FI is great for all those things. Where I ride there isn’t any significant elevation changes. Though I really love it for those choke-less starts, basically anytime I start it actually. Can be 35+ Celsius out on a hot summer day and she fires right up every single time with no issues.

My carbureted 300 well is another story. On those really hot days the minute I stop riding to take a break then and try and restart it 20-30 minutes later it often cranks over more then I’d like before it’ll stay. It would often take partially choking a hot engine or finessing the throttle to help assist it. And sometimes it would take me a few minutes before it did start. Mind you it was a air cooled engine. So that probably didn’t help. You could often hear the starter chug a tad slower when my 300 was real hot. Not sure why it did that, but it’s done it as far as I can remember.

Even winter starts with my 750 are way easier than with my 300. With my 300 I have to fully choke it (Enrichen It), start it, then back off the choke a tad after it’s started so it’s not excessively revving itself out. Then after it warms up a bit it’ll start to sputter so I have to remove the choke or it’ll die out. But even after that it won’t stay running unless I slightly push on the throttle for like another 10-15 minutes till the engine is fully warmed up. I use to stand there or sit on my bike for those 10-15 minutes which was overly annoying. So I found wrapping one of my wife’s hair elastics around the handgrip then stretching it over the throttle so it just slightly applied pressure to it worked like a charm. Would do other things around the garage, come back 10-15 minutes later and remove the hair elastic, then it be idling on it’s own no problem. I did that for years during the winter months and it never failed.

Most mechanics would say to me that these 300’s were like tanks, and he’s not wrong. But said they are cold blooded machines by nature. Now my 750’s FI system makes starting in an kind of temperature a breeze. Starts up hot no problem. And from a very cold engine the computer will adjust the air/fuel mixture as the engine warms up. No more enrichner or hair elastics, lol.
 

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You are definitely right there John. FI is great for all those things. Where I ride there isn’t any significant elevation changes. Though I really love it for those choke-less starts, basically anytime I start it actually. Can be 35+ Celsius out on a hot summer day and she fires right up every single time with no issues.

My carbureted 300 well is another story. On those really hot days the minute I stop riding to take a break then and try and restart it 20-30 minutes later it often cranks over more then I’d like before it’ll stay. It would often take partially choking a hot engine or finessing the throttle to help assist it. And sometimes it would take me a few minutes before it did start. Mind you it was a air cooled engine. So that probably didn’t help. You could often hear the starter chug a tad slower when my 300 was real hot. Not sure why it did that, but it’s done it as far as I can remember.

Even winter starts with my 750 are way easier than with my 300. With my 300 I have to fully choke it (Enrichen It), start it, then back off the choke a tad after it’s started so it’s not excessively revving itself out. Then after it warms up a bit it’ll start to sputter so I have to remove the choke or it’ll die out. But even after that it won’t stay running unless I slightly push on the throttle for like another 10-15 minutes till the engine is fully warmed up. I use to stand there or sit on my bike for those 10-15 minutes which was overly annoying. So I found wrapping one of my wife’s hair elastics around the handgrip then stretching it over the throttle so it just slightly applied pressure to it worked like a charm. Would do other things around the garage, come back 10-15 minutes later and remove the hair elastic, then it be idling on it’s own no problem. I did that for years during the winter months and it never failed.

Most mechanics would say to me that these 300’s were like tanks, and he’s not wrong. But said they are cold blooded machines by nature. Now my 750’s FI system makes starting in an kind of temperature a breeze. Starts up hot no problem. And from a very cold engine the computer will adjust the air/fuel mixture as the engine warms up. No more enrichner or hair elastics, lol.
Absolutely. FI is just perfect for the temperature changes.

Where I live is just about sea level. However, if I ride in West Virginia, they have elevations as high as near 4900 feet in that state. Pennsylvania is no stranger to peaks and valleys either. My KQ ran the same in my driveway at home as it did in Pennsylvania, or West Virginia.

Just perfect.
 

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So ... back to the original post ..... not leaking sitting flat but leaks on slight incline on a fuel injected machine. See if you can pin point the area it may be coming from. I'm not really sure, I'd like to look at the shop manual section on the fuel system. Maybe a fuel tank vent hose? does it leak with only a full tank of gas or does it leak no matter the level of fuel? Kind of hard to guess where to check unless you can try to narrow down the area where the fuel may be coming from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So ... back to the original post ..... not leaking sitting flat but leaks on slight incline on a fuel injected machine. See if you can pin point the area it may be coming from. I'm not really sure, I'd like to look at the shop manual section on the fuel system. Maybe a fuel tank vent hose? does it leak with only a full tank of gas or does it leak no matter the level of fuel? Kind of hard to guess where to check unless you can try to narrow down the area where the fuel may be coming from.
it leaks with tank almost empty or full. It will be used possibly for elk hunting the rest of this month then coming back to the house where I can get a better look at it. The incline it leaks at is so minimaal. Maybe 2" lower in the back.
 

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Ok, so you have a 2013 400 so I don't know how much of this is relevant or helpful, but I was going thru my shop manual pertaining to the fuel delivery system. To me, reading the shop manual is entertaining!

Anyway, it is a really simple system, in fact I'm rather intrigued on how simplistic the fuel system is. You have the tank in the rear with the pump system screwed into the top of the tank and is internal. There is one vent line on the top of that pump unit and the one main fuel feed hose that goes to the front of the machine, into the fuel delivery pipe and then into the fuel injector. There is no fuel return hose. The fuel feed hose connects to the pump by a plastic coupler ... very common and looks to almost be the same as on one of my bikes and also connects to the delivery pipe with a different coupler at the injector. My guess is that it is probably leaking from one of these connectors and you should be able to tell if the leak is more to the rear or front of the machine. If closer to the rear, it's probably coming from the connector at the pump at the tank and if its closer towards the front of the machine, it's probably coming from the connector into the delivery pipe at the injector.

If you inspect those 2 connectors at both ends and neither appears to be the leak spot, then I would guess there may be a small pin hole or crack somewhere in the fuel line between the pump at the tank and the feed into the injector. If not there, the only other place would be somewhere on the tank itself. I wouldn't think it would be leaking anywhere from the throttle body.

Good Luck, Hope you find the leak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok, so you have a 2013 400 so I don't know how much of this is relevant or helpful, but I was going thru my shop manual pertaining to the fuel delivery system. To me, reading the shop manual is entertaining!

Anyway, it is a really simple system, in fact I'm rather intrigued on how simplistic the fuel system is. You have the tank in the rear with the pump system screwed into the top of the tank and is internal. There is one vent line on the top of that pump unit and the one main fuel feed hose that goes to the front of the machine, into the fuel delivery pipe and then into the fuel injector. There is no fuel return hose. The fuel feed hose connects to the pump by a plastic coupler ... very common and looks to almost be the same as on one of my bikes and also connects to the delivery pipe with a different coupler at the injector. My guess is that it is probably leaking from one of these connectors and you should be able to tell if the leak is more to the rear or front of the machine. If closer to the rear, it's probably coming from the connector at the pump at the tank and if its closer towards the front of the machine, it's probably coming from the connector into the delivery pipe at the injector.

If you inspect those 2 connectors at both ends and neither appears to be the leak spot, then I would guess there may be a small pin hole or crack somewhere in the fuel line between the pump at the tank and the feed into the injector. If not there, the only other place would be somewhere on the tank itself. I wouldn't think it would be leaking anywhere from the throttle body.

Good Luck, Hope you find the leak.
thank you, I am headed back up hunting this weekend and will check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have it in the back of the truck now in the driveway. I can definitely see it drip off of the back of the pump, it drips one drop about every 30 or 45 second, but need to remove the plastics to get a real good look at it. Everything is clean and new looking ( this thing has less than 300 miles on it)
 
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