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My worry is the difference in caster angle between the manual and power steering models if it does go out. I am guessing it is harder to steer with the caster angle difference.
If we took a member survey of the miles driven in a single day, what do you think they would be? 30? 50? 75? Maybe 100? My last three day trip I logged 370 miles. That was riding with two different riders , on three different days. The second day alone was 175 miles. I never felt fatigued , tired, or in any way worn out. I didn‘t wake up feeling achy the next day either. My machines do not have power steering. I have never had it, and most likely never will.

Oh, by the way, next week I turn 61. I hope that clarifies my feeling on the need for power steering.
 

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2020 KingQuad 750
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I never felt fatigued , tired, or in any way worn out. I didn‘t wake up feeling achy the next day either. My machines do not have power steering. I have never had it, and most likely never will.


Me and my buddy usually average well over 100 miles per trip into the woods as well and I don't have power steering on my 2020 750 either. I have not yet been in a situation where I thought that I needed it. I'm 3 years younger than John1960, but I feel the same way. Compared to the dirt bike, this thing is So Comfy!! I don't feel fatigued at all at the end of the day. I do have to say, however, that this is the only 4 wheeler I've ever owned and ridden this much so I don't have anything to compare it to
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I am not worried about steering fatigue so much as i hope power steering would make it easier to turn when your in a situation where the tires just don't want to turn. Like on trails where your tires are in a situation on a trail where they are in ruts. Or like the last time i went to an offroad park there was this tricky part of the trail where the front end of the ATV was lower than the rear. And the weight of the ATV was pushing the atv forward and cocking the handlebars to the side. So it took both arms pulling on the bar to get them to move while trying to move forward. My friends can-am made situations like that easy but i was worried that the power steering would end up bending steering linkage, never happened though.

I have bent steering linkage on jeeps because the factory parts could not handle the added stress of bigger tires not wanting to turn when you were trying to make them turn anyways. But since then i have upgraded to 1 ton steering and haven't had a problem since. But i am not going to run larger tires on the 750 King Quad i will be keeping it bone stock.

This is the kind of dry and rutted terrain we ride in and sometimes you get into situations where Can-Am power steering helps a lot.

21448
 

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'86 LT230S QuadSport, '19 KingQuad 500
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I go through stuff like this all the time and the PS makes it maybe a little easier, but not that big of a difference. Never bent anything, but did rip up the bottom plastic skid on the 500 a couple runs ago. One thing the PS is good for, on pavement if you leave it in 4WD mode the PS masks the "kickback" such that it's easy to forget you're still in 4WD.

Plant Bedrock Slope Terrain Automotive tire
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Well i lucked out and found a dealer locally with a ton of KingQuads in stock and they are having a sale on them. Now i just need to decide if i want power steering or not.

 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I go through stuff like this all the time and the PS makes it maybe a little easier, but not that big of a difference. Never bent anything, but did rip up the bottom plastic skid on the 500 a couple runs ago. One thing the PS is good for, on pavement if you leave it in 4WD mode the PS masks the "kickback" such that it's easy to forget you're still in 4WD.

View attachment 21449

Another thing i forgot about is steering with diff lock on. I know in a jeep with the front axle locked steering is almost impossible even with power steering so i imagine on an ATV it's about the same. Does power steering help much with the front diff locked?
 

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I’ve used diff lock twice on my 750. Once going up a steep hill and once going through a mud hole. My 300 KQ also has diff lock. At very slow speeds it’s extremely hard to turn. At moderate speeds turning becomes slightly easier. I haven’t really noticed any huge difference between my 300 and my 750. Then again I’d have to do a test on the exact same type terrain to see if there’s any difference. My rule of thumb is if your uncertain if you want power steering or not, it’s sometimes best to just go ahead and purchase a power steering unit instead of having regrets about your decision afterwards if it should come to that. I’d honestly like to try a non power steering unit vs a power steering unit however to see if there’s any real noticeable difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I should update this thread. I went to my Suzuki dealer and test road a power and non power steering King Quad and the power steering was much easier at low speeds. So much so that i went with power steering because i felt it was worth it for the kind of riding i do. This ATV turns extremely easy at low speeds and i love it. I have had it on paved roads approaching 60mph and it does not feel unsafe to me. I would go faster but I'm still trying to break it in so I'm keeping it at about half throttle for now.
 

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I did the same thing when breaking my 750 in. I only went about half throttle for the first 200 to 300 kilometres, can’t remember which. Though I also varied my speeds quite often along with some light to moderate acceleration. There’s always been kind of a debate on wether to go with a standard break in procedure or just going full on out right out of the gate. But for me, the standard approach has always been the method I’ve used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I did the same thing when breaking my 750 in. I only went about half throttle for the first 200 to 300 kilometres, can’t remember which. Though I also varied my speeds quite often along with some light to moderate acceleration. There’s always been kind of a debate on wether to go with a standard break in procedure or just going full on out right out of the gate. But for me, the standard approach has always been the method I’ve used.
When i bought my 1999 Kawasaki Bayou 300 i did a light break in i was very easy on it. And my buddies old beat up 1996 300 Bayou always seemed to have more power than mine. It was previously owned and abused by a hillbilly so i am sure he did not do a light break in.

Fast forward years later i replaced it with my 2007 Vinson. I found an article about hard break ins being better at getting piston rings to seat. The theory behind it is when there is not much of a load the rings don't seal as well because the piston is somewhat hovering in the bore. And if you do a controlled heard break in when you accelerate hard you are forcing one side of the piston against the cylinder causing the rings to wear in and seal better. Then on deceleration (down shifting or engine breaking) you are forcing the other side of the piston against the opposite wall. So this way you are breaking in both sides. So i tried this on my 2007 Vinson and either i got a factory freak or it worked just as advertised. Because my 07 500 Vinson would lay waste to my friends 2003 and he couldn't believe it. He would always say it was either the hard break in or it was a factory freak.

I am doing the controlled hard break in on my King Quad. Putting a load on it by doing pulls up to around 50mph or so then letting off and letting the engine breaking slow it down. And when i cruise it it i vary throttle a lot and try not to cruise at an RPM where there is not much of a load on the engine. Since when there is no load the rings are not breaking in as well as they should be.

I discussed the hard break in with a GM mechanic friend of mine back when i was wondering if it was a good idea or not. He told me that it was a good idea and had sound theory behind it. He said that the GM dealership he worked in had a lot of Camaros and other cars with LT1's in them come back for burning oil. He said that GM had to replace them and they had a stack of LT1's that were in mechanically good shape but the rings just never sealed. He said the reason they didn't seal was because they did not break them in hard enough, too much time idling and not enough load put on them.
 

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When I broke my 750 in I did a somewhat moderate to hard break in. I’d constantly vary my speeds making sure not to cruise at a fixed rpm for to long. Then I’d slow down a bit then do a moderate or semi-hard acceleration till I hit around 60 kph, (38 MPH) then slowly lay off. I did this all through my break in and everything seems fine. And I’ve now got 1600 kilometres, (995 miles).
 
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