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Wondered why that word was sensored? I never knew anyone considered that word offensive. We use it all the time around these parts. Just Sayin... It's the perfect adjective for that wood plank tire thing.
It’s possible that the forums software kicked in and censored it.

When you get a chance, PM me with the verbiage and I can see what happened.

If the system won’t allow you to put the word in a PM, space it out like T. H. I. S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Goodness, I cannot break the bead free. I put some penetrating oil around the edge of the rim, I used my car jack, jammed between two walls, with a slightly angled piece of wood, to keep it near the rim edge, and to fill the gap, and jacked it up. Pretty sure I had one tyre wall touching the other, before I was done, lol, but still the bead resisted. My piece of wood would not stay right next to the rim though, no matter how hard I tried to position it, including trying different angles.

Next, despite the censored word advice, I put a thick plank on it, and drove Mrs S's car up onto the plank. Squished the tyre nicely, but still the bead managed to cling on. All went back to normal, when I reversed, lol.

Tyre guy it is.
 

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It’s possible that the forums software kicked in and censored it.

When you get a chance, PM me with the verbiage and I can see what happened.

If the system won’t allow you to put the word in a PM, space it out like T. H. I. S.
I’ve had the Forum sensor some words through PM before that I didn’t think it would have. Could very well be that it will sensor whatever word PilotJet sends to you through PM as well. I know it’s done this to me a few times sending PM to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Thought I would conclude this part of my wheel bead journey, with confirmation that I have done it. I watched a youtube video of a guy run over it with his car, and it seemed easy enough, with an automatic car, because you can left foot brake, for perfect control. I ran over one about 20 times, to no avail. I tried other wheels fewer times, but all to no avail. Who'd have though over 15 years without being removed would make it so hard, lol.

I don't like to give up though, so I decided I would cut them off and found a youtube video for that. Sawing the bulk of the tyre off, by drilling the side wall, and then running round with a jig saw, was easy, very easy, and left me with this.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Tints and shades Auto part


I scored two lines with a sharp blade, and then set about removing the rubber, down to the spring steel wires, with a Dremel and grinding attachment, as follows.

Head Automotive tire Helmet Automotive lighting Bumper


I then levered each one up with a screwdriver, and cut them with side cutters, and then bent them out of the way with pliers.

Brown Automotive tire Wood Liquid Floor


After bending that layer out of the way, you can grind more rubber away, which you can see below.

Wood Automotive tire Gas Automotive wheel system Auto part


On and on it goes.
Automotive tire Wood Gas Rim Tints and shades


Lever them up, and snip, until the last one, at which point by the way, it still will not budge.
Automotive tire Wood Twig Water Automotive wheel system


Once that last one is snipped, ping, it just falls off.

Automotive tire Gas Auto part Automotive wheel system Cookware and bakeware


Two per tyre, and it's done. I have a few reasons for being so persistent, but chief amongst them is I do not like to be beaten. Takes about an hour each, so two hours per wheel, and 8 hours total.

Now going to clean them all up, ensuring they are smooth, inside, and paint them. Not going to paint the outside, because I don't want the wheels to look new.

Cheers

Sutty
 

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Thought I would conclude this part of my wheel bead journey, with confirmation that I have done it. I watched a youtube video of a guy run over it with his car, and it seemed easy enough, with an automatic car, because you can left foot brake, for perfect control. I ran over one about 20 times, to no avail. I tried other wheels fewer times, but all to no avail. Who'd have though over 15 years without being removed would make it so hard, lol.

I don't like to give up though, so I decided I would cut them off and found a youtube video for that. Sawing the bulk of the tyre off, by drilling the side wall, and then running round with a jig saw, was easy, very easy, and left me with this.

View attachment 22363

I scored two lines with a sharp blade, and then set about removing the rubber, down to the spring steel wires, with a Dremel and grinding attachment, as follows.

View attachment 22364

I then levered each one up with a screwdriver, and cut them with side cutters, and then bent them out of the way with pliers.

View attachment 22365

After bending that layer out of the way, you can grind more rubber away, which you can see below.

View attachment 22366

On and on it goes. View attachment 22367

Lever them up, and snip, until the last one, at which point by the way, it still will not budge. View attachment 22368

Once that last one is snipped, ping, it just falls off.

View attachment 22369

Two per tyre, and it's done. I have a few reasons for being so persistent, but chief amongst them is I do not like to be beaten. Takes about an hour each, so two hours per wheel, and 8 hours total.

Now going to clean them all up, ensuring they are smooth, inside, and paint them. Not going to paint the outside, because I don't want the wheels to look new.

Cheers

Sutty
Nice work. A labor of love, but worth it.

I managed tire shops for decades and have instructed my staff on how to do this. The trick is to never cut into the rim. Even a slight nick can cause a leak in the critical bead surface.

I would suggest that you sand blast the rim bead. Then use bead sealer over the paint. Bead sealer will fill in small imperfections and make a gasket of sorts. Without that, I fear you may have slow leaks that will drive you crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Thanks, it was worth it for more reasons than I have explained here, other than just achieving it, but I can't really go into such detail.

I don't think I've damaged anything, on any of them, which I can get out with some fine wet and dry paper. Just the slip of a screwdriver here and there, which barely marked the paint, or rust, which granted might be enough, if I left it, but I reckon I can make it super smooth again, before applying a fine spray paint.

The shiny part, in the very last picture, is nothing more than where the rust has rubbed off from working on it and resting tools there, during the process. Although that part of the surface is rusty, pretty much all round, on all of them, it doesn't strike me as being the sealing surface, and I intend to get that smoother too.

I had planned to fit them, check for leaks, and if any observed, then release them again, and use bead sealer. I would use it right from the get go, but I don't know if it makes it harder to remove the tyres in the future and I was worried about that. Could you advise on this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 · (Edited)
Sorry to drag this out, but I thought I would share my pleasure. I carefully cleaned up the bead and valve seats, see picture. Funny looking dent, near top, is not, it's an optical illusion, caused by some weird reflection, it's good all round. They all were, pretty much, once cleaned. Hard work though. Not quite finished here, but I did a quick snap to show progress.

Tire Wheel Bicycle wheel Automotive tire Light


Spray painted them with zinc paint. Only did the bead seat areas, as I didn't have much, plus the rest of the paint seemed reasonably okay.

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Automotive design Water Rim


All four, alike.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Metal


Let it dry over night, and fitted them today.

Fronts took all of the 36 psi allowed to seat the bead. Stopped at 36 on one, and hit it with my rubber mallet, a lot, and it finally went. Other front went at just about 36 psi.

Rears took 25 psi, again with a limit of 36 psi, so well inside with those, but they have more side wall area to press out, so perhaps not surprising. I said 27 in the video, but it over reads by a couple of psi, whilst pumping, so it was 25 psi, when I turned it off.

No leaks from the seat, at all, at those respective full pressures, or from the valves. I'd also cleaned up and polished those holes, before painting. I'm assuming, if they don't leak at 25 or 36 psi respectively, they should also be good at the much lower running pressure, for these tyres, of 7 psi. They are at that now, so will know by the morning, because I have a precision low pressure gauge.

Three inflated without issue, one rear, was a complete sod. I could not seal the air, in order to pump it up. In the end, I used a ratchet strap around the tyre, hit the rim inwards, a whole bunch of times, with my rubber mallet, from both sides, and then also squeezed the sides in, where the bubbles showed it was leaking, by pulling with my body and hands. Took over an hour, to get that one to start inflating. If I had had high volume air, it would have gone right away, but I only have a tiny little care tyre inflator. The relief when I saw it rise from the poxy 5 psi that it had been permanently displaying, as I pulled on the tyre sides, was amazing.

Finally, enjoy with me, the seating of the final side, of the final rear tyre.


Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Motor vehicle


Cheers

Sutty
 

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I can't help but laugh a little. Reminds me of my first time changing tires. Problem I had was someone basically glued the tires on with some sort of sealer.

I bought a manual tire changer for somthing like $60 US. So the last few set's I've done were much easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I don't blame you. I realise some of it is a little comical, but I shared what happened, warts and all, so some might see the pitfalls, the frustration, and yes for the comedy value. I laugh too looking back on how some of the things panned out. No doubt your tool has been a great help, but I didn't want to spend that, for what, I suspect, might well be my only ever attempt at this exercise.

In the end though, I think I learned quite a lot, and am really pleased with the eventual outcome. I took all the wheels back to the quad yesterday, soon had them fitted, and the three of us used it, as usual, to get us, and all our gear, to our remote fishing spot, and back again, without drama. :D
 
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